electrek:

Tesla has adjusted its EPA estimated ranges across most of its lineup due to a new EPA rule that should make estimated ranges more realistic.

Earlier today, we reported on Tesla updating Model Y ranges for its 2024 model year with roughly 6% lower range across the board.

It turns out that Tesla has updated estimated ranges across almost its entire vehicle lineup.

The change was forced by an updated EPA rule.

In short, the rule change clarifies how to account for different drive modes and forces automakers to test for them and now advertise a range based on average results.

This is resulting in Tesla lowering ranges across almost its entire lineup. Interestingly, it resulted in a range increase for Model S Long Range.

Here are all the changes:

  • Model S:
    • Long Range:
      • 19″ wheels stayed at 405 miles
      • 21″ wheels went from 375 to 382 miles
    • Plaid:
      • 19″ wheels went from 396 to 359 miles
      • 21″ wheels went from 348 to 320 miles
  • Model X:
    • Long Range:
      • 20″ wheels went from 348 to 335 miles
      • 22″ wheels went from 330 to 332 miles
    • Plaid:
      • 20″ wheels went from 333 to 326 miles
      • 22″ wheels went from 311 to 300 miles
  • Model Y:
    • Rear-Wheel Drive:
      • 19″ wheels stayed at 260 miles
      • 20″ wheels stayed at 242 miles
    • Long Range
      • 19″ wheels went from 330 to 310 miles
      • 20″ wheels went from 318 to 292 miles
    • Performance
      • went from 303 to 285 miles

Model 3 ranges also remained unchanged, like with rear-wheel drive Model Y.

It’s unclear why some range estimates changed and others didn’t.

This is what EPA says about how to apply the rule change to new vehicles:

This new policy is applicable to new testing for 2024 model year and later vehicles. It may be applied to new testing for 2023 model year vehicles. Vehicles utilizing carry-over data may continue to use data generated under previous policy for as long as the tests are valid (i.e., no changes to the vehicle requiring new MPGe/range testing are required). Manufacturers who add a new configuration to a test group for 2024 and later must present new test results using this policy, but existing data can still be used if it is representative.

It’s possible that Tesla is not updating Model 3 and Model Y RWD because it is about to update those vehicles.

We have been expecting that Tesla will introduce the refreshed Model 3 in the US soon.

Electrek’s Take

This seems like a reasonable change that should result in a more realistic range estimate.

The EPA has been known to allow automakers some leeway to adjust their estimated range and Tesla has been known to use this leeway advantageously while other automakers are more conservative.

Therefore, this should bring Tesla closer to a more realistic range, resulting in fewer disappointed buyers.

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MuskWire TLDR:

Tesla has adjusted the estimated ranges of most of its vehicles due to a new EPA rule aimed at providing more realistic range estimates. The change was prompted by an updated EPA rule that clarifies how to account for different drive modes and requires automakers to test for them and advertise a range based on average results. As a result, Tesla has lowered the estimated ranges for most of its lineup, except for the Model S Long Range, which saw a range increase. The changes in range estimates vary across different models and wheel configurations. It is unclear why some range estimates changed while others remained unchanged. The new EPA rule applies to new testing for 2024 model year and later vehicles, and it may also be applied to new testing for 2023 model year vehicles. Vehicles using carry-over data can continue to use data generated under the previous policy as long as the tests are valid. Tesla’s decision not to update the range estimates for the Model 3 and Model Y rear-wheel drive versions could indicate that updates to those vehicles are forthcoming. Overall, this change should result in more realistic range estimates and reduce the number of disappointed buyers.