TechCrunch:

Tesla just chopped $3,000 off the price of its “full self-driving” beta software.

The 20% cut brings the cost of FSD down to $12,000 in North America. That’s precisely what Tesla previously charged for the advanced driver assistance system (ADAS), before hiking the fee to $15,000 about a year ago

Tesla vehicles come standard with some driver-assistance features, known as autopilot. The automaker charges $6,000 for what it calls “enhanced autopilot,” which introduces some extras to help with parking, as well as pulling the vehicle out of tight spots via a smartphone app.

For a lot more dough, Tesla owners can buy FSD, which includes all the “enhanced autopilot” features as well as the ability to detect and (ideally) stop at traffic lights and stop signs. While CEO Elon Musk has pledged that FSD will eventually offer full autonomous driving capabilities, Tesla vehicles are not self-driving, nor are they autonomous.

Tesla recalled its FSD software and temporarily paused new and pending installations back in February. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has since raised safety concerns about FSD, which Tesla intends to eventually license to other automakers.

Meanwhile, GM, Ford and other automakers are rolling out their own ADAS features. Such systems offer hands-free driving only on highways, while still requiring drivers to pay close attention to the road.

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MuskWire TLDR:

Electric vehicle maker Tesla has reduced the price of its “full self-driving” (FSD) beta software by $3,000. The price cut brings the cost of FSD down to $12,000 in North America, which was the same price that Tesla charged for its advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) before increasing it to $15,000 a year ago. Tesla vehicles already come with driver-assistance features, including Autopilot, but the enhanced Autopilot features cost an additional $6,000. FSD includes all the enhanced Autopilot features and the ability to detect and ideally stop at traffic lights and stop signs. However, it’s important to note that Tesla vehicles are not fully self-driving or autonomous. Tesla has faced some challenges with its FSD software, with recalls and safety concerns raised by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Meanwhile, other automakers like GM and Ford are also developing their own ADAS features that offer hands-free driving on highways while still requiring driver attention.